Changing the focus for hospitalized children

Imagine being six-years-old and landing in the hospital.  It’s not a fun trip for adults.  Think how frightening it can be for children.  Mike Miriello (’09) and his wife Megan  learned this first hand when Megan’s brother endured an extended hospital stay.  Right away, Mike and Megan realized that they could help children through the process of clever diversions. They started assembling video game carts with flat-screen tvs and video games that could be rolled into children’s rooms.   For their innovative idea to change the lives of hospitalized children, Mike Miriello is a new addition to JMU’s Be the Change Web site.  For more information about the Miriello’s plan to help these children — and how the research community agrees that they’ve got a terrific idea, go to:

http://www.jmu.edu/bethechange/people/miriello-mike.shtml

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About James Madison University
This blog is about the people of James Madison University — a caring, committed and engaged community spread all over the world, making lives better and brighter, healthier and safer, kinder and bolder. As Gandhi suggested, we are taking steps to BE the CHANGE we wish to see in the world. And these are our stories....

2 Responses to Changing the focus for hospitalized children

  1. grahammb says:

    Bravo to the Kiwanis Club of Harrisonburg for supporting Mike Miriello’s great idea. While we all debate health care on a national level, it’s inspiring to see real action taking place. One person, one organization can make a significant difference, and the Miriello’s and the Kiwanis club are shining examples.

    Like

  2. John B. Reeves says:

    The Harrisonburg Kiwanis Club (I’m member of) was favorably impressed last fall when Mike Miriello showed and described to us his ideas and research. We provided funds for first 2 trials systems at 2 Depts. at Rockingham Memorial Hospital, which he set up in early January. With the good feedback that he’s gotten from the key nurses, these system should be appliable and useful at other hospitals!

    Like

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