Our kinship with Veterans

Veteran_and_FlagMy favorite veteran, my Dad, would have been 91 on this Veterans Day. I miss him. But he and all Veterans never really leave us because of the unmatched legacy they leave behind. In the same way, those Veterans still with us give us an example of a kind of change that we should all consider every day.

You may think I’m talking about the fight for freedom or liberty or Democracy, but I’m not. While that is a lasting legacy of American Veterans, it is only one part of what they give us. They have another legacy as well, one more subtle but just as important.

Originally called Armistice Day, Veterans Day commemorates the end of hostilities in World War I. This occurred at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. Seven months later, the Treaty of Versailles was signed with the belief that it was ending “the war to end all wars.”

We now know it wasn’t.

There are many wars yet to be fought — and not all of them are on a battlefield. There are battles against poverty, disease, neglect, lack of opportunity, prejudice, hate and misunderstanding.

Veterans provide us with a model that encourages us to stand up for what we believe, to fight for what is important, and to do so with unflinching courage and honor. Most of us are not Veterans in the sense we celebrate today, Veterans Day 2013. We do not have the credentials to rise to their level of service — often in faraway places, in distant lands, and many times under difficult and life-threatening circumstances — but we can emulate their dedication and their commitment to a cause. Whatever that cause may be.

The courage of conviction that Veterans exemplify and their labor to meet challenges and overcome obstacles is essential to any kind of battle. And in that sense, any of us could — and should — find ourselves in shoes similar to those of the American Veteran. Changing anything in the world for the better requires a level of conviction and commitment that Veterans so ably demonstrate.

And while we practice our own commitments to change, we can’t forget that in addition to setting a high bar, American Veterans have guaranteed us with a base camp of freedom from which we can roam throughout the world, where we can carry on with our own missions of change. Consider the hundreds of JMU alumni who’ve served in the Peace Corps, who have participated in Alternative Spring Breaks, who’ve founded and supported missions, who have become teachers through Teach with America, who have provided jobs through business ventures, who serve the homeless, the downtrodden and the often-forgotten.

America’s Veterans have given us the safety to pursue positive change, and they have given us a shining example of dedication and conviction. It is in the long and lasting shadow of their military service that each of us has the opportunity to Be the Change.

About grahammb
This blog is about the people of James Madison University — a caring, committed and engaged community spread all over the world, making lives better and brighter, healthier and safer, kinder and bolder. As Gandhi suggested, we are taking steps to BE the CHANGE we wish to see in the world. And these are our stories....

One Response to Our kinship with Veterans

  1. Andy Perrine says:

    Well put.

    Like

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